How to Stick with It When You’re Learning Something New On Your Own #yam

English: My Learning Ltd - Secondary Learning ...
English: My Learning Ltd – Secondary Learning Platform Logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Most of us have a passion to learn something new—whether it’s advancing our skillset, picking up a new hobby, or just taking on an entire new learning experience—but unless you’re incredibly dedicated to it, learning something new is surprisingly hard to stick with. Here are a few ways to make your new habit stick.

We’ve talked about plenty of different resources for learning on your own. The problem isn’t that the data and classes aren’t out there and freely available, it’s coming up with the dedication and structure when you don’t have a bill from a college hanging over your head. A recent Open Culture survey shows a number of the most common reasons people don’t complete online courses, ranging from the time required to complete a class to simple old learning fatigue. Most of these problems are easy to deal with.

While you might show an interest in something that doesn’t mean you’ll always stick to it. So, I spoke with Kio Stark, author of the recently released book, Don’t Go Back to School the book should be available on Amazon this week as well about how to come up with a self-education plan you’ll actually stick to.

via How to Stick with It When You’re Learning Something New On Your Own.

1:1 Computing in Education – Microsoft UK Schools blog – Site Home – MSDN Blogs

Image representing Microsoft as depicted in Cr...
Image via CrunchBase

As the global economy embraces the digital age, it is important that the delivery and focus of education evolves to better equip learners with the 21st Century skills that are key to their future success.

With this challenge in mind, a number of factors come into play, but arguably one of the most significant drivers to help build 21st Century skills is 1:1 computing in education. Whether it’s helping to equip children to compete in the global economy or driving equality and social mobility, 1:1 computing is described by many, including the Sutton Trust in their recent research, to be a prerequisite for improving learning outcomes and helping to build 21st Century skills.

via 1:1 Computing in Education – Microsoft UK Schools blog – Site Home – MSDN Blogs.

Learning STEM Skills by Designing Video Games | Edutopia

US Navy 100727-N-4304M-001 A student at a scie...
US Navy 100727-N-4304M-001 A student at a science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) summer camp at Ryken High School in Leonardtown, Md (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Texas 10-year-old Rhys uses Gamestar Mechanic to program and create worlds to play in, learning valuable skills in science, technology, engineering, and math along the way.

via Learning STEM Skills by Designing Video Games | Edutopia.

‘Our School Would Be Better Off Without iPads.’ | Edudemic

English: iPads can be a distraction to learning
English: iPads can be a distraction to learning (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

We go on and on about iPads, tablets, phablets, and just about every other piece of technology out there. But the discussion is slowly changing. It’s becoming less and less about how to deploy as much technology as possible. Instead, the discussion is shifting (luckily) back over to effectively connecting with students. Check out the recent post by George Couros to see what I’m talking about. It’s easy to see that there is a slow pivot happening in education right now where we’re becoming a little less enamored by shiny new iGadgets and other tech tools. Instead, we want to figure out how to effectively use what we have in order to actually connect with students.

So that’s why it was interesting to see a comment pop up on a recent post here on Edudemic about iPads. In that post, someone who wrote as ‘student 21′ pointed out the problem of deploying iPads in school. They’re not always effectively used. This goes for iPads as much as any other learning resource (electronic or not). It’s all in how the device is used.

via ‘Our School Would Be Better Off Without iPads.’ | Edudemic.

Read the original article for the details.

6 Reasons to Invest in Better STEM Education [#INFOGRAPHIC] | EdTech Magazine

US Navy 100727-N-4304M-001 A student at a scie...
US Navy 100727-N-4304M-001 A student at a science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) summer camp at Ryken High School in Leonardtown, Md (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

There’s no escaping the urgency for better science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) instruction in the nation’s K–12 schools. If you don’t know by now that U.S. students have struggled to keep pace with their international counterparts in important core subjects, such as math and science, we’ll assume that you’ve spent the last several years teaching under a rock.

But just how bad is the problem—and what can U.S. schools do to better prepare students for the demands of an increasingly technical, STEM-intensive future?

We recently came across this interesting infographic from nonprofit Edutopia, which illustrates how a firm math and technology-based education can improve students’ long-term job and career prospects.

via 6 Reasons to Invest in Better STEM Education [#INFOGRAPHIC] | EdTech Magazine.

This infographic is for the USA but the Scottish picture is similar.

Educators Share Tech Struggles: From Tablets To Twitter – Education –

Image representing Twitter as depicted in Crun...
Image via CrunchBase

Should teachers use social media? What are the best practices for flipped classrooms? How are educators in other countries using computers and networks?

These were but a few of the 400 session topics at the 68th annual meeting of the ASCD this past weekend in Chicago, where technology‘s impact on teachers, students and institutions dominated much of the discussion. This year, the nonprofit’s three-day conference and exhibit drew more than 10,000 educators and administrators, as well as hundreds of vendors.

But technology isn’t a panacea, said ASCD speakers and attendees.

“We must think through how to help students use technology as a tool rather than having that tool rule our lives,” Freeman A. Hrabowski III, president of the University of Maryland, declared during his keynote in the first general session Saturday. Rather than focus on tech skills per se, Hrabowski said, “the key skill every student should have coming to college, other than reading, is the ability to ask good questions.”

via Educators Share Tech Struggles: From Tablets To Twitter – Education –.

TeachThought | 30 Incredible Ways Technology Will Change Education By 2028

Technology Map - Tutornet
Technology Map – Tutornet (Photo credit: steven w)

Technology is changing at a rapid pace, so much so that it’s challenging to grasp.

While there is little uniformity in technology, there are some trends worth noting that have spurred tangent innovation, including speed (a shift from dial-up top broad band), size (from huge computers to small handheld devices), and connectivity (through always-on apps and social media).

In fact, we have some to expect nearly instant obsolescence—smartphone contracts that last a mere 24 months seem like ages. Whether this is a matter of trend or function is a matter of perspective, but it’s true that technology is changing—and not just as a matter of power, but tone.

In 2013, technology has become not just a tool, but a standard and matter of credibility. While learning by no means requires technology, to design learning without technology is an exercise in spite—proving a point at the cost of potential. And it’s difficult to forget how new this is.

Fifteen years ago, a current high school sophomore was born.

So was Google.

via TeachThought | 30 Incredible Ways Technology Will Change Education By 2028.

What Skills Do Employers Want from Candidates? [INFOGRAPHIC] #yam

skills-16
skills-16 (Photo credit: Vancouver Island University)

Do you have the skills that would make employers want you? This infographic (from Youtern) shows what the employers want, and what the candidates need to get.

Takeaways:

Strategic perspective is the most valued skill by an employer.

Many hiring managers believe skills can be learned.

70% of hiring staff rate interview skills as necessary for success.

via What Skills Do Employers Want from Candidates? [INFOGRAPHIC].

How and Why to Intentionally Set Yourself Up for Failure #yam

English: learn
English: learn (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The old mantra is that you’re never supposed to set yourself up for failure. Thats true in most cases, but its not a black and white issue. Failures good for you, and its often the only way you learn. Putting yourself in a position to fail might sound weird, but its more beneficial than you think.We know that learning from your mistakes is one of the best ways to learn, but the idea of actually setting yourself up for failure is a road few of us are willing to venture down. That said, its important to remember that the cost of failure is nothing, and if you set aside a “safe zone” where you’re not afraid to fail when learning new skills, you’ll be better for it in the long turn.

via How and Why to Intentionally Set Yourself Up for Failure.

Plea to minister as secondaries set to abandon computer studies

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Image via Wikipedia

Is this an isolated incident or the shape of things to come?

Plea to minister as secondaries set to abandon computer studies – Borders Today

SEVERAL secondary schools in the Borders have taken the controversial decision to remove computer studies from their timetabled options and effectively close their departments.

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